Why First Person Content is So Important for Small Businesses on Facebook

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Why First Person Content is So Important for Small Businesses on Facebook title

Facebook is noisy. In June of 2014, Facebook announced that there were 30 Million active Small Business Pages. What makes your business page unique from those other 30 million? The answer should be a simple one: First Person Content.


What is First Person Content?
First person content is content that is completely unique to your business that you create. This can be a wide range of things with everything from pictures and videos that are taken at the place of business (birthday parties, cute dog that came in, cool car that rolled into the shop, new product you need input on, etc…) to infographics created in house to show that you are a thought leader in the industry. The range is extreme and all of those types of posts help your business page even more than you think. Here are a few reasons as to Why First Person Content is so Important for Small Businesses on Facebook:

Organic Reach Chart 2014
Facebook Organic Reach Feb 2014

First and foremost, people use Facebook to keep up with friends, family, celebrities, businesses that they are interested in, news, and even the occasional BuzzFeed quiz. What does this mean to small businesses? It means that there is a whole lot of noise to break through in order to be seen by even a small percentage of your audience. Early last year, Facebook organic reach has gone from around 16 % per post to as little as 1% per post.

This sounds like a huge percentage drop-off, and it is, but there is a very good reason for this decline. Facebook went into depth with their reasoning, which you can find here, but the two main reasons behind the drop are:

1. Competition (“On average, there are 1,500 stories that could appear in a person’s News Feed each time they log onto Facebook.” source)

2. Facebook Algorithm (…”News Feed ranks each possible story (from more to less important) by looking at thousands of factors relative to each person.” source)

It’s understandable why small businesses are upset about the huge drop in reach, interaction, and shares, but after realizing the two points above, I hope you are a little less angry. Read on to find out why First Person Content is so important.


What makes First Person Content so important?
The Facebook Algorithm. No one truly knows what the specifics are with the Facebook algorithm, but periodically they announce types of posts that will no longer be looked at as “quality content” e.g.: memes, like baiting, spammy links, text-only posts, and more. This is why first person content excels on Facebook. Take a look at these posts and the difference in sheer numbers alone:

Warren's Auto first person content stats
First Person
Warrens' Auto not first person content stats
Non-First Person

Utah Physical Therapy first person content
First Person

 

Utah Physical Therapy non first person content
Non-First Person

As you can see, there is a gigantic difference between the stats for the First Person Content vs. the Non-First Person Content. If you have posted First Person Content on your business page, go in and take a look for yourself at the difference in posts. Just go to “Insights” and click on “Your 5 Most Recent Posts”, which will bring up all of your past posts. This is where you can really get down to what has been working and getting the audience’s attention. Keep in mind that although “Reach” isn’t the best factor to judge your Facebook content on, it is a good indicator as to how the Facebook algorithm views your post.

I now challenge you to try out First Person content on your Facebook Business Page and see how it works out. If you end up trying this strategy, please comment below and tell me how it went.

Need a little inspiration from Small Businesses Doing Facebook Right? Check out my last week’s blog post here.

Happy trails!

– Jackson Salzman

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